Climate and species protection in one of the last natural paradises of the earth


Peru is the third largest country in South America, home to world´s largest rain forest – the Amazon. There is tremendous biodiversity within the Peruvian Amazon. Scientists suspect that 10% of all indigenous animal species have not been discovered yet. Moreover the tropical rainforest is of vital importance to world´s climate, sequestering and storing an unrivalled portion of atmospheric carbon.

Madre de Dios is a region south-eastern Peru, sharing borders with Brazil and Bolivia. It is almost entirely covered by rainforest. For many years the area has been considered inaccessible, which has also provided some level of forest protection. However, new road construction projects have led to drastic changes.

Peru is the third largest country in South America, home to world´s largest rain forest – the Amazon. There is tremendous biodiversity within the Peruvian Amazon. Scientists suspect that 10% of all indigenous animal species have not been discovered yet. Moreover the tropical rainforest is of vital importance to world´s climate, sequestering and storing an unrivalled portion of atmospheric carbon.

Madre de Dios is a region south-eastern Peru, sharing borders with Brazil and Bolivia. It is almost entirely covered by rainforest. For many years the area has been considered inaccessible, which has also provided some level of forest protection. However, new road construction projects have led to drastic changes.

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Spotlight:

The project creates new income opportunities for the people living in the project area. Sustainable forestry management and the protection and surveillance of the project area are reliable sources of income for local communities.

The project enables small local farmers to sustainably cultivate, harvest and process brazil nuts. Additionally they get easy access to international markets to sell their final product.

The project reduces the emission levels of Greenhouse gases. Furthermore, by allowing the forest to recover, trees are able to absorb CO2 emissions, further reducing levels within the atmosphere.

Sustainable Development

While focusing on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, all our projects also generate multiple co-benefits. These are supportive of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

By supporting this project you’ll contribute to the following Sustainable Development Goals:

Project activities


The Rainforest Community Project brings hundreds of local families together who traditionally harvest Brazil nuts in Amazon forest. Together, all members of the newly-founded cooperative manage about 300.000 hectares of rain forest that will be protected by and for the cultivation of Brazil nuts.

Subsequent to harvest, the nuts are processed and prepared for sale on local and international markets. Providing access to microcredits and targeted investments decrease the dependence on intermediaries. As a result, nut farmers are enabled to keep bigger shares of profit for themselves.

Another important building block of the project is efficient and sustainable forestry. This creates additional income opportunities without further exploitation of natural resources. In parallel, the project is committed to protect the rain forest from deforestation and to prevent nut theft. To monitor a bigger area of the vast forest, alert systems are installed to report intruders early on.

This package of measures helps to protect seriously endangered forests and simultaneously improves the living conditions of those in the project area. Ultimately, the rainforest and it´s natural products become valued resources of their own, which decouples economic growth from overexploitation.

Success

The project creates alternatives to deforestation for timber and to make room for pastures. People in Madre de Dios are enabled to preserve their culture and retain the traditional cultivation and harvest of Brazil nuts in the natural rain forest.

By imparting professional knowhow and further professionalization of forestry, people in Peru can earn their living in a sustainable way that saves valuable resources.
Setting up control mechanisms protects the rain forest and small farmers. Additionally it makes overexploitation more difficult.

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Contact and Information:

Projektbroschüre

(PDF)

Dr. Jochen Gassner
Phone.: +49 6101 55 658-55
E-Mail: jochen.gassner@firstclimate.com